KIDA's Microfinance Program

Update April 12, 2017
 
KIDA's very successful microfinance program, in existence since 2007, is currently making a large profit. Proceeds from the program in 2016 enabled a purchase of a piece of land to address overcrowding in the current space, the purchase of software for financial management, AND a donation to KIDA Hospital along with a surplus of $6,000, all while making business loans totaling $180,000! The members own the assets and make policy and spending decisions at an annual meeting, recently held in March 2017. Architectural plans have been drawn for an office building planned for the puchased land plot.


Charles Beyendeza is both a farmer and a businessman. He began saving with KIDA's microfinance program three years ago, and when he had enough savings, he took out a loan to improve his small retail shop that he operates near his home. He is the main breadwinner in the family and farms his small plot of land while running his shop. A year later, he had enough income to pay back his loan and start building his savings again. Just recently he took out a second loan to purchase a motorcycle and hired a boda-boda driver whom he pays weekly. With patience, discipline and hard work, Charles is gradually lifting himself and his family out of poverty.

        Charles tends his matooke grove. Matooke is a staple food in the Ruwenzori foothills


 

KIDA operates the only SACCO (Savings and Credit Cooperative) in Uganda that accepts membership from the vulnerable AIDS affected population.  Its goal is to empower the vulnerable.

Those who join KIDA's SACCO open a savings account first and receive training in saving and borrowing.  They are required to save a small amount regularly.

The program is open to both HIV positive clients as well as to local community villagers who do not have HIV. 

A member can apply for a loan not more than three times the value of that member's savings balance.  There are application requirements and repayment requirements.

KIDA's SACCO elects a board of directors and holds an annual meeting.  The money belongs to the members.  A committee approves loans.

In December 2014 there were 1825 members and membership increases monthly.  The program is self-supporting and thus does not require any subsidies from Friends of Ruwenzori Foundation. Some proceeds help fund operating costs of KIDA Hospital.

 


A KIDA SUCCESS STORY: PELUCE

Peluce Businge is a 40-year-old woman who cares for six children and an elderly mother. She says, "The Kitojo Care savings and credit cooperative (SACCO) has changed my family's life."

An enterprising woman with commitment and business plans to generate family income, Peluce abandoned another village saving group when the group was mismanaged and she lost money. She joined KIDA's SACCO in 2009 and after saving for three years, qualified for her first loan that allowed her to purchase land and, after repaying and receiving another loan, built a brick house on it for her family.  While generating income from a shop selling cloth and supplies in the village, she has a good repayment record, allowing her to procure loans for things like a refrigerator to keep milk for sale and school fees for one of her children to attend nursing school.

Peluce Businge, mother of six, selling boutique items in the local village


 
 
 
Charles tends his matooke grove. Matooke is a staple food in the Ruwenzori foothills
 
Peluce Businge, mother of six, selling boutique items in the local village
Peluce Businge, mother of six, selling boutique items in the local village